Tuesday, 24 January 2017

Will You Be Left Behind When Spring Has Sprung? Here’s How To Stay Ahead



At this time of year, it’s easy to concentrate on keeping yourself cosy, warm and occupied inside of the home. Because of the harsh temperatures and the even harsher weather conditions, you don’t always want to prioritise any work that needed doing outside of your house. But, a keen gardener will always get ahead of the game and start early. It’s true, there are ways that you can enjoy your garden in winter, but you can also work on getting it ready to enjoy spring as soon as it’s here.


Clear What You Can


Firstly, you should work on clearing away whatever you can. This may be a task that you set yourself at the very start of winter, which will mean that you have less to do now. But, if your garden is currently full of weeds and leaves and dying buds, it’s time to get outside and get to work. Rip away what you no longer need and clear beds ready for planting. You’ll also want to deadhead anything that will reappear in spring.


Pick Out Your Furniture


Then, when the garden is a lot clearer and tidier, you’re going to want to start doing your research for how you’re outside living space will look. If you want to enjoy your garden as soon as the warmer days arrive, you’re going to want to get this task done fast. Whether you choose comfortable sofas or wicker furniture, consider what options will work best and pick out a set to buy now.


Plan Your Design


Now that your furniture is chosen, you can think about the design of the rest of your garden. You might have gone with the same style in the previous years, but if you’ve chosen a new style of outdoor living furniture, you might want your garden to follow suit. Either way, you need to know what you’re going to plan and where you’re going to plant it. You could even think about buying bulbs and keeping some plants indoors if you want to get them all into the ground as soon as the frosts are finished.


Create A Cooking Area


Then, you’re going to want to complete the rest of your living space. Choosing the furniture isn’t enough. If you plan to spend a lot of time outside during spring and summer, it’s likely that you’ll be dining al fresco on many occasions. So, you need to work out what cooking equipment you’ll need, including any grills, as well as additional seating, drinking areas or preparation stations.


Decorate Away


At this point, you might feel as if your outdoor living space is really taking space. But, it’s likely to be missing a few things. To ensure that the space feels comfortable and complete, you’re going to want to accessorise in any way that you can. Firstly, you might want to add in some lighting, or at least purchase it ready, for when the nights draw in and you’re still outside. It can also be an idea to stock up on blankets and throws to decorate the area, as well as heaters for when the weather drops.



Monday, 23 January 2017

In the Night Garden: Designing a Garden for Evening Hangouts

Do you want to use your garden more often? Too many people only get outside when it's warm, dry and sunny. Even when it starts to cool in the summer evenings, they retreat inside to continue their fun elsewhere. But if you think you should use your garden more often, you can set it up for evening use. As the sun goes down and even when it's almost completely dark, you can continue to sit outside and enjoy your garden. You just need some useful features to ensure the space is still enjoyable in the dark.


Rustle Up Some Warmth


The first thing that might concern you about using your garden in the evening is the temperature. Even in the summer when there's a rare heat wave, it can cool down in the evening. And if you want to use it at other times of the year, the temperature could be much lower. But don't let the cold stop you from enjoying your garden. Start by installing an outdoor heater or having somewhere you can light a fire. Create a comfortable seating area with blankets and think about how to shelter it from the wind too.


7528673482_67bfdf6f16_z.jpg


Light Up the Night


Of course, you're going to need some light for your garden if you want to use it in the evening. If nothing else, it will help to make the garden safer. There are several types of light you might choose to use outside. Installing some LED decking lights is a great idea so that you have some lights under your feet. Put lighting at different levels, including over your head and close to you when you sit or stand. You can use wired lights, solar powered lighting, lanterns and candles for different effects.


Keep the Drinks Flowing


When you're out in your garden, you're probably enjoying the space with friends or family. If everyone is having drinks, you don't want to have to keep going back inside the house. There are a few things you could do if you wanted to keep the drinks coming. Setting up an outside bar could give you a space to make drinks all evening. You could even consider some facilities for making hot drinks. Have an outdoor kitchen or just use some camping equipment to make hot drinks for anyone who wants them. You could even use an open fire to boil water or milk.


Provide Some Entertainment


You might also want something to do while outside in the evenings. Your first thought might be to have some music. If you want to do this, you need to think about soundproofing. You should try to make your garden as insulated as possible, so your neighbours don't hear you. This is good practice anyway if you're going to be outside chatting. Don't forget to consider getting some speakers that are designed to work outside. They need to be tough and possible stand a bit of moisture.


You don't have to abandon your fun in the garden when the sun goes down. If you want to continue partying, it doesn't take much to create the perfect evening space.


Thursday, 19 January 2017

Incredible Landscaping Ideas You Can Get Done for Summer



Summer is still at least half a year away yet, but that doesn’t mean you can’t get some work done in your garden! In fact, some renovation of the outdoors of your property right now could be started around now and be finished for summer so you can enjoy them properly in the sunshine.


You shouldn’t underestimate the ability of your garden to adjust to the colder climate. A lot of people seem to think that winter is a time in which nothing is worth doing to your garden - that you’ll just end up wasting your time because everything out there is dead and infertile.


But this simply doesn’t apply to every sort of garden work. Indeed, crafting a beautiful garden for winter is something a lot of gardeners are keen on. But what about landscaping? A lot of people would dismiss any full-on renovations for this time of year. Besides, how would they possibly be done in time?


Not all renovation projects take nearly a year or more to complete. Here are a few ideas you get started on now and finish in time for the sunny months.




Secluded resting place


Feels strange the type the phrase “resting place” when talking about your garden, right? I’m not referring to building yourself a grave in your backyard! I’m referring to the development of a small and simple getaway tucked somewhere near the back of your garden. Bring in a few hedges and flowers towards the back of your garden and get yourself a luxurious outdoor chair. Position everything so where you’re sitting is out of the house and vice versa. In other words, make this seating area secluded by vegetation. You’ll be surprised at the feeling of escapism this can bring!


Decking


This is one of the most popular home renovations of all time, and for good reason, too. It’s practical, fun, luxurious, and adds great value to a property. But can decking really be completed within six months? If you get the planning done properly and work with good contractors, then you can get it done in a matter of weeks without having to skimp on quality. In these darker, wintry months, you may want to ensure that there’s decent protection so the wood doesn’t get too wet while you’re working on it. As long as you have that, there’s no reason why you can’t start a decking project in winter and get it finished by summer.




Courtyard

Another project you may think takes much longer than it actually does. Even if you throw in some new steps leading up to your back door, the project can be completed in a matter of weeks. Of course, a “garden courtyard” is actually a much more vague term that you may realize. There are so many varieties out there, so it’s possible that the image you have in your head is a very complex project that could indeed take a little too long for it to be ready in time for summer. Your best best is to check out a bunch of courtyard ideas to see what would work best for your garden.

Thursday, 5 January 2017

Looking after your orchids

It is often said that more orchids fail as a result of getting the watering regime wrong than any other reason. When it comes to watering epiphytes there are two elements to consider when considering your watering regime, these are When and How. The vast majority of orchids grown by hobby growers are naturally found on trees above the ground where the light is more plentiful. Most orchids that are not terrestrial need their roots exposed to light, air and water.

When to water?
Orchids should be watered as they start to dry out. Dont allow them to completely dry out, but just before. This rule generally works for most orchids with variations depending on whether the orchid is able to store its own water. Orchids such as cattleyas and oncidiums should be allowed to dry completely between waterings while orchids such as phalaenopsis and paphiopedilums that have no water storage organs should be watered before they dry out.

There's is no strict rule on how to water, that can apply for every grower. This is because your local growing environment will not be the same as anyone else's. Key climatic differences such as temperature, humidity, air movement, the potting mix (type and age), and light levels all influence the watering requirements of individual plants.

When deciding whether to water, there are several identifying clues to determine when a potted orchid is almost dry:

  • the surface of the potting mix will appear dry when the potting mix is moss 
  • dry pots will feel lighter when lifted.
  • clay pots feel dry;
  • If you insert a pencil or wooden skewer into the potting mix when removed it will come out almost dry.

Generally it is best to water your plant in the morning to give the moisture on the leaves time to dry off during the day, this will reduce the risk of fungal damage. If any water remains in the center of the plant then use some kitchen towel to dry it off.

Many people prefer to use natural water rather than tap water to avoid any of the added chemicals or to have water with a different PH. If you use water treatment such as that provided by Lagan Water then this can help increase the range of plants you are able to cater for.

During the summer months when temperatures are higher then you will need to water more frequently, and conversely in the winter months water less frequently. Keep in mind that temperatures close to the window on a windowsill will be colder or hotter than your general house temperature. Keeping your plant away from radiators in winter will help minimise premature drying.

When orchids are watered, they should be watered copiously, infrequent and plenty is better than little and often. Place your plant into the sink and let the water run freely from the drainage holes for about a minute. Do not use salt-softened or distilled water. Allow the plant to drain completely. This is an opportunity to examine how the potting mix behaves. If you cannot pour water rapidly through the pot, the potting mix is too dense and you run the risk of starving the roots for air. If you see finely divided material that looks like coffee grounds in the water coming from the drainage holes, your potting mix is breaking down and it's time to repot into fresh mix.

Cymbidium Putana gx x Claudona gx

Cymbidium Putana gx x Claudona gx
Cymbidium Putana gx x Claudona gx

Thursday, 17 March 2016

How to give your garden a tropical twist

If you’re a lover of orchids like we are, then you’ll already be a fan of the tropical plant life and species that are so evocative. So, why not turn your own garden into a tiny tropical paradise? With the right elements added, any space can be turned into a calming area for reflection and relaxation.

Cymbidium Doris Dawson 'Scotch Mist'
Build colourful textures
The right use of trees in your garden is essential to creating the tropical look you want. While you might want the privacy of a rainforest, putting too many overbearing trees into one area can make the space feel too cluttered and claustrophobic. A great way of getting the variety of textures that you want, is to use short trees planted in the shade of larger trees. 

The Japanese Mapel tree is ideal for this kind of planting, as they’re known for their shorter sizes. Consider using either a horizontal or cascading maple in the shade of a darker evergreen. This can create a truly stunning effect as the seasons change, given that they’re recognised for being at their best during the autumn. You can pick up many types of Japanese Maple tree from thetreecenter.com.

Add a water feature
If it’s tropical you want, then no space would be complete without a plentiful supply of water. This will depend largely on the style you’re going for. If you prefer everything pruned to perfection, then a pond or rockery water feature will be the ideal addition. Plus, they promote the growth of local wildlife, helping to add that natural touch to your garden.

If you want more of a rainforest-chic look in a larger space, you might think about a waterfall idea to one side of your garden and a large pool of water. Adding a small wooden bridge would add another texture and dimension too, while your Japanese Maples will feel right at home in a cooler environment next to water.

Create a relaxation space
The whole point of creating this tropical paradise is to give you an escape from the stresses of modern day life, so making room for your own meditation is crucial. No matter how big an area you’re dealing with, try to create your own hidden space between the trees. If you’d like plush furniture for a luxurious feel, go for wicker and other wooden options so that it blends into the environment, as though it’s sprung up from the earth! 

If you’re not too particular on it being discrete, have the area in an open space with an outdoor wood-burning stove or heater. That way, you’ll be able sit outside to relax regardless of the time of year. If you'd like some more ideas on how you can create the perfect garden retreat, click here.


I hope you found these tips on giving your outdoor space that tropical twist helpful. If you’re creating your own outside relaxation area, leave us a comment and tell us about your experience.

Thursday, 26 February 2015

Three Solar LED Light Solutions For The Perfect Evening Garden

Creating that perfect, beautiful garden setting (dare we say it) involves so much more than a complete range of beautiful plants. Your garden is your safe haven, and at night can become a beautiful addition to your home.

We love pottering in our garden during the day and enjoy sharing the fruits of our labour with others when entertaining in the evening. With this in mind, the folks at BrightLightz have created a great little list with the top 3 outdoor lighting options that any home owner can implement quickly and on a budget, without ever skimping on style.

Solar fairy Garden Lights
Any garden, large or small can benefit from a range of solar fairy garden lights adding gorgeous illumination on their plants, pathways and garden features. Once installed, solar fairy garden lights can turn your garden into a wonderland and best of all; they cost absolutely nothing to run. Reliable, sturdy, weather resistant and good looking, these lights can add a gorgeous glow to your surroundings and outdoor entertainment areas for 8-10 hours after a full charge. Just leave them up year round and let them do their thing.


Solar powered LED Fence lights

Solar powered fence/stair lights are quite simply a must have if you’re proud of your plants. Featuring two super bright LED’s encased in a waterproof sealed unit, these are great LED options that will bathe your chosen area of the garden in a lush white hue, adding a feature point to your favourite patch of garden instantly. These cool lights also act as a safety feature for stairs, meaning less chance of tripping up at night. They’re easily attached and removed, and have absolutely no wires or cables attached meaning your garden will still look neat and tidy.







LED decking lights
Placing decking lights in your garden can be one of the most heartbreaking experiences ever. Digging up grass and unsettling the perfect garden bed just to place wires underground that we may have to dig up again because they’ve decided to break on us, is a laborious and quite frankly redundant experience. Yuk. Luckily some bright spark went and invented a range of solar powered LED decking lights that can be placed instantly without the need for wires and cables. Simply cut a hole in the decking area you need and place these lights inside, for a bright, all night glow. Fortunately, this set at BrightLightz is made with stainless steel meaning they’ll never rust and the waterproof sealed casing means condensation on the inside is never a problem. After a full charge, these puppies will glow for around 8-10 hours. Perfect for those with pebble paths too.

So whether you want to turn your garden into the ultimate entertaining area or just want to appreciate your work in the moonlight as well as the day, solar LED garden lights are the most cost effective option. And they look great too!

Tuesday, 13 January 2015

Cymbidium Doris Dawson 'Scotch Mist'

Another fantastic Cymbidium from McBean Orchids Silver Gilt winning display at the RHS Plant and Design Show is the fantastic winter flowering orchid Cymbidium Doris Dawson 'Scotch Mist'.
Cymbidium Doris Dawson 'Scotch Mist'

Cymbidium Doris Dawson 'Scotch Mist'

Cymbidium Doris Dawson 'Scotch Mist'
Cymbidium Doris Dawson 'Scotch Mist'

Cymbidium Doris Dawson 'Scotch Mist'

Wednesday, 10 December 2014

Phalaenopsis Brother Janet

Phalaenopsis Brother Janet 
Phalaenopsis Brother Janet is a vigorous growing Phalaenopsis, this one was on display at the RHS Hampton Court Flower show.

Thursday, 13 November 2014

Cymbidium Chelsea Red

Another beautiful Cymbidium hybrid, Cymbidium Chelsea Red.

Cymbidium Chelsea Red 
Cymbidium Chelsea Red

Sunday, 5 October 2014

Orchid Watering

It is often said that more orchids fail as a result of getting the watering regime wrong than any other reason. When it comes to watering epiphytes there are two elements to consider when considering your watering regime, these are When and How. The vast majority of orchids grown by hobby growers are naturally found on trees above the ground where the light is more plentiful. Most orchids that are not terrestrial need their roots exposed to light, air and water.

When to water?
Orchids should be watered as they start to dry out. Dont allow them to completely dry out, but just before. This rule generally works for most orchids with variations depending on whether the orchid is able to store its own water. Orchids such as cattleyas and oncidiums should be allowed to dry completely between waterings while orchids such as phalaenopsis and paphiopedilums that have no water storage organs should be watered before they dry out.

There's is no strict rule on how to water, that can apply for every grower. This is because your local growing environment will not be the same as anyone else's. Key climatic differences such as temperature, humidity, air movement, the potting mix (type and age), and light levels all influence the watering requirements of individual plants.

When deciding whether to water, there are several identifying clues to determine when a potted orchid is almost dry:

  • the surface of the potting mix will appear dry when the potting mix is moss 
  • dry pots will feel lighter when lifted.
  • clay pots feel dry;
  • If you insert a pencil or wooden skewer into the potting mix when removed it will come out almost dry.

Generally it is best to water your plant in the morning to give the moisture on the leaves time to dry off during the day, this will reduce the risk of fungal damage. If any water remains in the center of the plant then use some kitchen towel to dry it off.

Many people prefer to use natural water rather than tap water to avoid any of the added chemicals or to have water with a different PH. If you use water treatment such as that provided by Lagan Water then this can help increase the range of plants you are able to cater for.

During the summer months when temperatures are higher then you will need to water more frequently, and conversely in the winter months water less frequently. Keep in mind that temperatures close to the window on a windowsill will be colder or hotter than your general house temperature. Keeping your plant away from radiators in winter will help minimise premature drying.

When orchids are watered, they should be watered copiously, infrequent and plenty is better than little and often. Place your plant into the sink and let the water run freely from the drainage holes for about a minute. Do not use salt-softened or distilled water. Allow the plant to drain completely. This is an opportunity to examine how the potting mix behaves. If you cannot pour water rapidly through the pot, the potting mix is too dense and you run the risk of starving the roots for air. If you see finely divided material that looks like coffee grounds in the water coming from the drainage holes, your potting mix is breaking down and it's time to repot into fresh mix.

Thursday, 24 July 2014

Can gardens unlock the secret of our memories?

 Whether you’re green fingered or not, almost everyone loves being out in the garden. From small city yards to sprawling countryside properties, there’s something soothing, relaxing and rejuvenating about greenery, plants, flowers and fresh air.

As well as making us feel better, new research from the University of Exeter Medical School has found that being out in the garden can actually be incredibly therapeutic, especially for those suffering from dementia.

If you have a loved one who suffers from dementia and you’re looking for a way to release their memories and help them relax, here’s how being out in the garden could make a huge and positive difference.

Calming

One of the most important ways that being in a garden affects those suffering with dementia is to calm them. The beautiful plants and flowers, combined with the peaceful atmosphere, can help dementia patients to feel more relaxed. This in itself can ease the symptoms of their condition while providing a pleasant place for them to spend their leisure time.

Interaction

Where a garden is in a shared space like a McCarthy & Stone retirement home, it can also provide an important opportunity for dementia patients to interact with other residents, family and friends. Being in a familiar surrounding like a garden can make these interactions easier for dementia patients, allowing them to regain a sense of normality and helping them to remember old routines.

Unlocking memories

Not only does being more relaxed and having increased levels of interaction help dementia patients unlock old memories but the sensory stimulation and familiar environment provided by a garden can help trigger memories too.

While in a garden, dementia patients are more likely to remember old habits that have brought them enjoyment in the past and recall the potential hazards of gardens and outside spaces.

In some instances, gardens for dementia patients have been completely transformed to provide a range of sensory experiences, with one care home even building a typical seaside scene in their garden to allow residents to remember their holidays by the coast.

These sorts of outdoor experiences have proved so effective in helping to unlock old memories in dementia patients that the Department of Health has recently announced a £50m investment in care homes, much of which will go to the transformation of outside spaces.

By creating familiar scenes and scenarios for dementia patients and helping them to relax, gardens play a crucial role in managing the illness and easing its symptoms, helping to build a better quality of life for those suffering from dementia.



Wednesday, 16 July 2014

How to take care of your garden when travelling

Everyone looks forward to a summer holiday abroad but for keen gardeners a week or longer away from home during the peak of summer can take its toll on a beautiful outdoor space. As you might expect, in order to keep your garden healthy whilst you are away, preparation is key. Read on for hints and tips on how to ensure you'll find a healthy lawn and garden on your return.

1. Enlist the help of friends and family
Whether you are relying on the help of a sibling or have a willing neighbour at hand, never underestimate the difference their help can make! For gardeners worried about their prize vegetables or beautiful blooms, having someone to water them regularly and protect them from hungry pests is worth its weight in gold. For the community minded a gardening time share might also be something to consider.

2. Protect vulnerable plants from the elements
With hot temperatures and unforeseen showers threatening to ruin your garden whilst you are away, it really pays to investigate all your options. If you are considering landscaping for example, there are many advantages to installing wooden fencing. Alternatively, growing conifers to create shade or building a greenhouse or bedding vulnerable plants like strawberries with straw are all excellent ways to protect helpless vegetation.

3. Water thoroughly
The day before you head off, make sure you give the lawn a mow followed by a good soak. Trimming the grass to a slightly shorter length means it won't need as much water but also ensures it won't burn during a sudden sunny spell. Whilst you are away, sprinklers or a few inches of mulch are a great way to ensure plants and grasses stay hydrated.

4. Safeguard plants from direct sunlight
Before you leave, move all of your containers and hanging plants away from direct sunlight and place them in an area of dim shade. During your absence, this will slow down their growth and lessen the amount of water that they require. Remove bottom trays to prevent plant roots rotting and prune any darkening leaves to enable the plant to conserve its reserves.

5. Check for problems
Always do a quick check the week before you leave and try to take care of any problems you can upfront. For example, signs of fungus, aphid infestation or animal pests can be addressed with pesticide sprays or temporary fencing. 

Tuesday, 29 April 2014

Orangeries: Storing Plants the British Way

One of the most effective means of storing plant life is through the use of an orangery. Ever since these structures were introduced into UK homes during the 17th century, they have been a staple of British homes, becoming more prominent during the 20th century to the point where there now several hundred-thousand UK homes with one.

Despite becoming an extra room added to British homes for a variety of reasons, such as being used as home offices and children’s play areas, the most prolific use of an orangery remains their original intended use of cultivating exotic plants that the climate of good old blightly will not allow for, such as citrus plants.
But what are the correct methods and means of storing plants in an orangery?

Getting the lighting right!
For a plant to truly prosper in an orangery environment, the lighting inside needs to be kept at a level higher than others rooms of the house. This is because the material used for both standard and bespoke orangeries is different to that used for ordinary houses and offices. These materials causing sunlight to pore onto the plants in a way that a household plant will not experience, therefore, considerable shading is needed for the plant’s health. This is particularly true of conservatories and orangeries that are built facing in Southern or Western direction.

The use of window blinds is ideal for achieving the right light as their tilting effect prevents excessive light from entering. Alternatively, painted-on shading can be used. This is a practical water diluted colouring product that is either painted or sprayed onto the outside of an orangery to effectively filter sunlight with no damage to plant life inside.

Watering the plants
The water needed to keep a plant healthy is usually dictated by its size, its number of leaves and the weather conditions surrounding it.

A leafy plant stored inside a small pot will need watering every day during the summer months, and should ideally be watered at least every two days throughout the rest of the year. However, a plant with less leaves and growing within a larger pot is not as likely to require such frequent attention.

As a general rule, watering once or twice a week will be sufficient for plants in such a position, but this is not to say that such an approach should be observed without giving consideration to the appearance of each plant individually because checking plants separately is vital in establishing the level of water it requires.

This check assessment can be made by looking to see if the plant’s compost is drying out. If it is, be sure to add enough water to the plant so that you are sure it is reaching the bottom of the pot.

Don’t be afraid to let a little water pour out the bottom as this indicates that the plant has received enough water to maintain its health for a while. But don’t go crazy with the water either, after all, you don’t want to drown the roots. It’s also worth remembering that cactus plants require less water than others.

Repotting plants in an orangery
If maintained correctly, a plant can prosper fantastically inside an orangery, and this can even mean that the plant becomes so healthy and large that it needs a larger pot to maintain it. When a plant becomes too big for its pot the roots begin to dry out. If you are unsure of whether the roots are suffering behind the disguise of a plant pot, gently remove the plant from its pot and observe the rootball. If it appears tight or you can see the roots protruding, be sure to pot it again as soon as possible. If you make this discovery during the spring or summer months, get the plant in a new pot immediately as the growth of a root is strongest and quickest during these months.

To decide what size pot you should use, the best method is to judge accordingly; but if you are struggling to make a decision, it is advisable to just use a tub that has a circumference of 2-3 cm bigger than the last one you used. Also be sure to feed and maintain the plant in this new pot in as similar a manner as before. After all, the reason you’re repotting the plant is because it’s grown so well under your previous nurture methods. Be sure to keep it well watered after repotting to make sure the roots are comfortable in their new soil.

But what plants should I cultivate?
The original intention of orangeries was to use citrus trees to manufacture fruit such as Oranges, Lemons and Grapefruits. This is still practiced extensively today by orangery owners using a home temperature of 4°C and upwards.

In order to achieve the best effects from their growth, it’s best to keep citrus trees in the lightest area of a conservatory and feed them regularly with citrus fertiliser. Before long you’ll be enjoying a variety of beautiful flowers and delicious exotic fruits in the comfort of your British home. It’s not often you can say that!

If you want to reap the many benefits of adding an orangery to your home, be sure to contact Auburn Hill where bespoke models are custom made to cater for the usage of all customers.   

Thursday, 17 April 2014

Repotting Orchids in Bark - A simple Video Guide

Its quite easy to repot your orchids providing you have the correct equipment, orchid grade bark chippings come in differing sizes, if the plant roots are thick choose a larger one, if they are small and thin then choose small chippings. They make a good general compost.

Monday, 14 April 2014

Bollopetalum Midnight Blue 'Cardinal Roost'


Bollopetalum Orchids are created by crossing a Bollea with a Zygopetalum. This stunning example is Bollopetalum Midnight Blue 'Cardinal Roost'which is a cross between Bollea violacea x Zygopetelum B. G. White.

Monday, 7 April 2014

Masdevallia pastinata

Masdevallia pastinata is an intresting species that grows on the western slopes of the Andes in the El Choco region in Colombia. Since Masdevallia stay very small, you can also cultivate a nice collection of Masdevallia on your window sill. The most important condition is a good water quality. They do not like dry air, so misting twice a day is advised if you are not in a humid location. In Europe, these orchids can stay on a facing south window during the winter months, however from late spring to early autumn they should be moved to a less sunny window the temperature in the winter must not drop below 5-7°C.